Hiking the trails (copyright istockphoto.com)

Who knows what adventures are waiting to be found along the trails of the Parkland? You’re sure to be inspired by some of the vast panoramas that only a trek across the prairies can provide.

Rossburn Subdivision Trail (RST)

This portion of the Trans Canada Trail (consisting of an abandoned CN branch line) begins in Neepawa and continues to Russell, passing through the communities along PTH45. Completed areas are ideal for hiking, walking, horseback riding, cycling, and cross‑country skiing. Most of the 176 kms (110 miles) are groomed for snowmobiling in winter. Symonds “Rails to Trails” Kiosk in Sandy Lake features maps and pictorial histories of the Rossburn Subdivision of the CNR and the village. In 2010, the refurbishing of the entire trail was completed, providing a smoother surface for cycling and horseback riding. For more information, visit www.trailsmanitoba.ca.

Moose Trail

Located off PR264 north of Angusville, the Moose Trail wanders through 3 kms (2 miles) of forest, meadows and plains, meaning wildlife sightings are plentiful. Suited to walking and mountain biking in summer, the trail is also groomed for cross-country skiing each winter. There’s a warm-up shack at the halfway point.

Crocus Trail

Another stretch of the Trans Canada Trail, the Crocus Trail leads you through the historic grain elevators at Inglis, past Asessippi Ski Area & Resort, up to Roblin and Goose Lakes, and finally through Duck Mountain Provincial Forest to the Saskatchewan border at Madge Lake. This trail offers many scenic vistas through forests, valleys and along cultivated areas. A Trans Canada Trail pavilion is located at the junction of PTH5 and PTH83 in Roblin. For more information and for an update on the few portions of the trail not yet signed, call 204‑937‑6273.

Russell Trail (near Grandview)

In the late 19th century the government of the still‑young province of Manitoba found itself in a bit of a quandary: immigrants were flooding into the Parkland area, and some were leaving again, dissatisfied with the lack of good roads and railway connections. Until 1903, the closest railway terminus to Dauphin was nearly 100 km to the southwest at Russell. Construction of the Dauphin‑Russell Colonization Road—the Russell Trail as it would come to be known—began in 1891 as a means of providing access from the Dauphin area, which already boasted a population of some 1,200 settlers, to goods, markets and more immigrants via the railway at Russell. One mile of the old trail has been redeveloped for recreational use. Travel 8 km (5 miles) south from Grandview on PR366. From here, turn east onto the trail.

Riding Mountain National Park

The trail network in the park is extensive with some trails accessible from various municipalities surrounding the park. Trail information is available at the RMNP Visitor Centre, or call 204‑848‑7275.

Baydak Trail

The trail starts at the very north edge of Silver Beach, off PR264 north of Angusville, and continues in a 5-km loop into Riding Mountain National Park, leading adventurers to Horseshoe Hill and Twin Dams Crossing. The trail is not maintained.